Five tips for speeding up your iPhone or iPad

iPhoneIconXUnless you are using a significantly older iOS device, then iOS should run at acceptable speeds on supported devices. Even if some apps have relatively demanding hardware requirements and give you choppy performance, when browsing through your apps, using Apple’s provided apps, and otherwise using the OS’s built-in features should at least be a relatively responsive experience. However, if not then there are some things you can try to make your iOS device more responsive and snappy. Continue reading

What to do about error -36 and other I/O errors in OS X

ConsoleIconXWhile rare, in OS X you may run across a problem where upon copying or accessing files and folders, the system will stop and display an warning that simply states the operation could not be completed because of an error. For the most part when this occurs, you will see error code -36 displayed, but it can also include other numbers. If these happen, there may be a quick fix you can try, but generally they indicate unknown low level problems with your Mac. Continue reading

Apple Watch 1.0.1 update breaks Heart Rate Monitor data collection

AppleWatchAfter installing the recent Watch OS update 1.0.1, a number of Apple Watch owners have found that the device’s heart rate monitor has stopped working. Under general use, the Apple Watch should monitor your heart rate when in the background, taking readings every 10 minutes to update the health app on the device. However, with the 1.0.1 update, the monitor may only work when directly instructed to do so, and when put in the background it will pause and stop taking readings. Continue reading

How to contact your iOS App’s developer

MacAppStoreIconXEvery now and then you may have an app on your iOS device that stops working properly. In some cases it may stop responding to tapping and dragging, or it may unexpectedly quit and drop you back to the main iOS home screen, either during launch or shortly after loading. At other times your app may be working as expected, but you have a special need or concern that you would like to have addressed. In either situation, contacting your app’s developer may give you some quick answers. Continue reading

Browser address bar exploit persists in Safari; other Mac browsers unaffected

NewSafariIconXA bug that existed in both Chrome and Safari continues to persist in Safari, and allows a malicious Web site to spoof the browser’s address bar to make it appear that you are at one URL when in fact you are at another.

When data phishing sites attempt to steal your information, they will commonly create page layouts that mimic popular and trustworthy pages like those from Facebook, Paypal, Apple, and others. While some of these are impressively similar to the official pages, one easy way to detect them is to look at your address bar and see that the page’s URL is not an official one. Continue reading

Apple issues Watch OS update 1.0.1

AppleWatchFor those who have purchased an Apple Watch, Apple has released the first OS update to fix a few outstanding bugs in the device’s initial release. The update, which is about 51MB in size, brings fixes for Siri, as well as improvements for measuring several activities, including standing time, calories for cycling and rowing workouts, and distances for walks and runs. Continue reading

How to manually remove MacKeeper from your Mac

MacKeeperIconXOne of the more controversial pieces of software available for OS X is a package called MacKeeper, which by fairly aggressive and widespread scare-tactic advertising has many Mac users convinced it is required software for keeping their systems safe, clean, and in proper working order. Any claims that this or similar software are requirements are false, but unfortunately many who have tried the software may find that even after removing it, they still have remnants of it on their systems that issue various notices about how their systems are critically unsafe, with recommendations to re-activate and re-install the software. Continue reading